Esteemed thinker: Johannes Vermeer

pancake There are three times of the day that rally the attention of all people regardless of where or who they are; and though some enjoy one of these times more than the others, they are significant to both man and woman. These times are relegated to the sounding of a clock, watch, or grumble of one’s stomach…they are none other than breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

There was a time where eating these meals was common place. Yes, true, some fanfare was made if it was a festive occasion however; the daily preparation was simply considered part of life’s chores. Bread was made from milled wheat, eggs were gathered or bought at markets, and meat was selected from butcher shops, produce squeezed and smelled to ensure it was ripe, and deserts rolled and filled. Meals were elaborate or simple, and those who prepared them went about their business in the same manner the accountant or mechanic would trundle off to work.

Fast forward to today and the preparation of a meal has become a spectator sport. It is marveled and ogled with the same degree of wonderment for the cook that one would think they were on a mission to space. Television shows are endless with audiences tuning in to watch. People travel around the world and viewers observe other people eating. One has to wonder what has happened. Has the 21st century become so conditioned to fast food and microwave heating that cooking a chicken is considered a heroic feat? The next thing you know, setting the table will become a national sport!

Self-portrait (1656)

Self-portrait (1656)

Today’s post brings to you the esteemed thinker: Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675 b. Dutch Republic of Delft ) a Dutch artist who lived in the era we now call the Golden Age of Dutch painting. Virtually self-taught, he is considered one of the greatest Baroque painters. He began his career painting large scale biblical and mythological themes, his later work are the pieces we are most familiar with, interior daily life. Throughout his career as an artist he experimented with techniques, his work with light and purity of form are what he is best known for.

And so I bring to you one of the masterpieces of the 17th century, The Milkmaid (1668: also known as the Maidservant). Johannes Vermeer, the extraordinary artist has captured the very essence of a domestic world that was considered quite an ordinary way of life.

Veneer the-milkmaid

Esteemed thinker: John Locke

experience When we look back upon our day or night we often compile the hours as bits of experiences. What we did, what we ate, who we interacted with… and as a result of these experiences we often evaluate the day or night; whereupon if asked we would respond with, “I had a good day or bad day depending upon the experience encountered. And if we were to collect these continuances, we could stretch this element of time into years, thus compiling quite the grand allotment of experiences.

However, an experience is really an idea for you can’t manufacture in the same category with a tangible item…rather it is a personal state of mind, something that we have collected and stored in the crevices of our brain, only to retrieve at will or sometimes involuntarily as a resurrection of a nightmarish or traumatic “experience”.

Experiences formulate our conceptions, our perceptions, and even how we react to people, places and things… for if our episode was met with an unsatisfactory encounter…it can leave a lasting impression, and what is an impression…merely another intangible idea denoted by a strong feeling from the immediate effect of our experience…

John Locke Today’s blog takes us back a bit to the 17th century where we will meet the esteemed thinker: John Locke ( 1632-1704), English philosopher and physician whose influence on the philosophy of politics was so powerful that he is thought of as the founder of philosophical liberalism. His book Essay on the Human Understanding is considered his greatest work upon which he is most famous for. He opposed the foremost idea of “innate principles’ which contended that “we are all born knowing certain fundamental principles, such as “whatever is, is.” Rather, he presented his argument against innate knowledge, asserting that “human beings cannot have ideas in their minds of which they are not aware, so that people cannot be said to possess even the most basic principles until they are taught them or think them through for themselves.”

So, let us take time to ponder Mr. Locke’s idea and drift back the 1600s where we will read a selection from his Essay of Human Understanding, Book II…

“… All Ideas come from Sensation or Reflection. Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas:—How comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it with an almost endless variety? Whence has it all the MATERIALS of reason and knowledge? To this I answer, in one word, from EXPERIENCE. In that all our knowledge is founded; and from that it ultimately derives itself. Our observation employed either, about external sensible objects, or about the internal operations of our minds perceived and reflected on by ourselves, is that which supplies our understandings with all the MATERIALS of thinking. These two are the fountains of knowledge, from whence all the ideas we have, or can naturally have, do spring…

The mind thinks in proportion to the matter it gets from experience to think about. Follow a child from its birth, and observe the alterations that time makes, and you shall find, as the mind by the senses comes more and more to be furnished with ideas, it comes to be more and more awake; thinks more, the more it has matter to think on. After some time it begins to know the objects which, being most familiar with it, have made lasting impressions. Thus it comes by degrees to know the persons it daily converses with, and distinguishes them from strangers; which are instances and effects of its coming to retain and distinguish the ideas the senses convey to it. And so we may observe how the mind, BY DEGREES, improves in these; and ADVANCES to the exercise of those other faculties of enlarging, compounding, and abstracting its ideas, and of reasoning about them, and reflecting upon all these; of which I shall have occasion to speak more hereafter…”