A well-balanced meal can lead to good (reading) habits

Children need a variety of foods to be strong and healthy; but they also require a varied reading diet to stimulate lifelong reading. As such, why not combine the two by having them design their own reading menus with at least one serving of:

* Fruits & Vegetables – Poetry
* Soup – Current Events
* Fish – Science/Nature
* Meat – Biography/History
* Dessert – Fiction
* Milk – Sports/Hobbies
* After-dinner mint – Comics

Not all readers are created equal but like the saying by Maimonides in the 12th century said: Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime. By offering a banquet of reading they should find something delectable!

So, if you want to help someone make sense of the world, give the gift of reading. It’s delicious!

Reading is power…

A growing child needs a variety of foods to be strong and healthy; but they also require a varied reading diet to stimulate lifelong reading. A daily well- balanced reading diet may be designed using a menu with at least one serving of:

Fruits & Vegetables – Poetry

Soup – Current Events

Fish – Science/Nature

Meat – Biography/History

Dessert – Fiction

Milk – Sports/Hobbies

After-dinner mint – Comics

But what happens when reading does not go down as well as intended? Allow reading deficits to go on for too long and they can manifest into more than a dislike for reading. Not all readers are created equal but like the saying by Maimonides: Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime. The analogy is that offering reading strategies help readers become better readers.

So, if you want to help someone make sense of the world, give the gift of reading.

Sunshine in every meal!

  • TIRED OF HOT KITCHENS

High electric bills and spoiling the environment?

HOW ABOUT TRYING A SOLAR COOKER?

  • Never waiting for an oven to preheat
  • Needing less time to prepare and cook food
  • Using multiple ovens simultaneously
  • Cooking food safely while you’re away from home
  • Worrying less about exact timing and temperatures
  • Virtually no oven cleaning

And…it’s fun!

Solar Cookers Directions

1. Carefully line the insides of the container with aluminum foil so that the foil is as smooth as possible. Try to avoid crinkles. You need only line the sides.

2. Make a small hole in the sides for the skewer to go through.

3. Place the container on its back and then push one end of the skewer through the container.

4. Push the food onto the skewer and then bring the skewer through.

5. Put plastic wrap around the open part of the oven and you are ready to cook!

6. Place your oven in a spot that receives a lot of sunlight. You will need to prop the oven so that it is at an angle perpendicular to the rays of the sun. In this way the sun will hit the oven head on, and not at an angle. As the sun’s rays hit the curved, reflective surfaces inside the oven, they will be deflected and concentrated on your food.  

Cooking time will vary depending upon the time of day and year.

Esteemed thinkers: the Casket Girls

We are of a world of diversity, and as history has shown us this diversity comes with many claims. However, regardless of how one may view the world there is one need that unites all; that is of food. As far back as time and humans were recorded, food has been an essential need that initiated recipes which are in the coarse of constant flux according to acquisition and taste.

Not long after 1718, when the French founded New Orleans, ships carrying young women were sent as wives by the French government with dowry suitcases and casks to the new settlers. However, upon their arrival what these young ladies did not anticipate was the crude grains upon which they were supposed to bake with. Unlike their French flours which they were accustomed to use and bake their delicate breads, life in the New World was a culinary disappointment, where they grew quite discontent with the coarse cornmeal provided them.

Taking matters into their own hands, the young brides demanded the finer wheat be sent over. Not wanting to waste the precious wheat, the French women soaked the extra bread that had become stale in a mixture of sweet milk and eggs, fried in butter and served with preserves.

Alas, you may recognize this dish, it is the one we call French toast, but what in the early 1700s it was recognized as as ‘pain perdu’ or ‘lost bread’.
Bon appétit!


Homowack breakfast table, Mamakating, New York